Pre-conference course

Saturday 10/6-2017

9.00-12.00

Spectroscopy
Jim de Haseth, Professor Emeritus, University of Georgia (USA), and Technical Officer, LLS Instruments, Inc.
Jim de Haseth has more than 40 years experience with vibrational spectroscopy and vibrational spectrometer instrumentation. His interests have involved studies in the mid-infrared, Raman, and near-infrared, development of analytical methodologies, hyphenated methods, data processing, protein conformation, and fundamental studies of mid-infrared, near-infrared, and Raman spectra.
About the course
This course will emphasize the assignment of spectral bands in the NIR region. This will start with a discussion of the fundamental vibrations in the mid-infrared and explain how overtone and combination bands can appear in the NIR. Some direct guidelines will be presented to show which transitions are allowed. This will not be a theoretical discussion that involves mathematics or quantum mechanics, but rather an understanding of the physical phenomena that led to the development of the mathematical approaches. Further topics will be instrumental issues such as resolution, data intervals, instrumental effects on spectral lineshape, characteristics of different instrumentation types, and, effects of mathematical manipulation of spectra.

 

Saturday 10/6-2017

13.30-16.30

Sampling
Anders Larsen, Managing Director, Q-Interline
Anders Larsen has 20+ years of experience with industrial implementation of PAT and spectroscopy in a wide range of industries and applications.
About the course
Under the general headline sampling, this course will focus on a variety of Sampling errors, visualized and understood with practical examples. The course addresses four major topics: how to take the physical sample from a process, time dependent sampling from the process, presenting the sample to the analyzer & sampling the sample optically.

 

Saturday 10/6-2017

17.00-18.00

Essentials for industrial-level NIRS application
Phil Williams, R&D Director PDK Projects, Nanaimo B.C., Canada
will be available soon
About the course
A NIRS calibration translates the spectral data directly into terms of the reference data, whether that be composition, physical, or functionality factors. After calibration the instrument multiplies the spectral data from any sample presented to it by the calibration equation, which is essentially a constant, so the efficiency of the prediction depends heavily on the quality of the spectra. If the spectral precision is poor this will inevitably result in impaired reproducibility of analytical results. But six things are absolutely essential to successful application of NIRS, and must be addressed before any samples are scanned. No matter how comprehensive is the chemometric software, it will not fully compensate for imperfections in any one of these prerequisites. These are: 1. Accurate, and reproducible reference analysis 2. Excellent spectral precision 3. Comprehensive sample selection, and assembly 4. Efficient sample presentation to the instrument. These 6 items will be described in detail during the course.

 

Sunday 11/6-2017

9.00-12.00

Calibration
Åsmund Rinnan & Rasmus Bro, KU FOOD
Åsmund Rinnan is associate professor in exploratory data analysis and have extensive experience in pre-transformation, variable selection and calibration of NIR spectra. Rasmus Bro is professor in Chemometrics and has worked for 22 years in development and application of chemometric models in food, pharma, medicine and related areas.
About the course
In order to relate the recorded NIR spectrum with reference data, for use in the quality or process control it is necessary to make a calibration model. Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) is the major tool for performing such a calibration model. However, even though this to a large extent can be done through the push-button-I-do-not-know-what-I-do principle, a humbler entrance to the whole process will give you more robust and meaningful model in the end. In this course, we will go through the most common pre-processing techniques for NIR spectra, as well as some well-established variable selection techniques. Finally, we will go through a set of common mistakes in calibration building that we have seen several times throughout the years.

 

Sunday 11/6-2017

13.30 – 15.30

NIRS in process analytical technology
Frans van den Berg, KU FOOD
Frans van den Berg is an associate professor specializing in Process Analytical Technology and Chemometrics. He has an appreciable experience in data analysis, specifically the application of chemometrics, statistics and mathematics in (process) data collection for monitoring and control aims.
About the course
NIR has become the workhorse in Process Analytical Chemistry and Technology (PACT) in industry, where ease of sample-instrument interfacing and high measurement frequencies are two of the key factors. However, a successful NIR solution will only be achieved if process dynamics and other production aspects are integrated into the design. In this course we will use real world examples of NIR in continues, semi-continues and true batch processes to better prepare the participant for real-world challenges.

 

Sunday 11/6-2017

15.30-16.30

Transportation to Bella Center for opening ceremony and Karl Norris lecture, followed by the opening reception.

 

Venue University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg Campus

Thorvaldsensvej 40 1958 Frederiksberg C  

Price: Students DKK 750 / EUR 100 per course day Non-students DKK 1.500 / EUR 200 per course day. A max. of 100 participants can sign up per day. Sign-up is binding and available seats are allocated first-ordered first-served. Prices includes lunch, coffee, refreshments and all course materials

 

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